Name: Giulio Coppi.

Nationality: Italian.

Country of Assignment: Kyrgyzstan.

Area of work: Human Rights (OHCHR).

Where in the world have you travelled?

France, Switzerland, England, Ireland, The Netherlands, Germany, Austria, Belgium, Greece, Turkey, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland, Croatia.

Where did you grow up?

Italy.

What did you study in university?

BA in Law, and MA in International Legal Affairs.

What are the best and worst jobs you have had?

I am lucky that I cannot define any of the jobs I had up to this moment that bad to be considered as “worst job.” The best was my Internship period at TPB/UNODC in Vienna: good colleagues, challenging tasks, great outcomes. If the Internship is not to be considered a “job” I would say my period in the International Partnerships Dept. at Glocal Forum, a Swiss Foundation.

Why did you apply for the UNV programme?

There are so many reasons why I chose to apply as a UNV Volunteer. Firstly, my previous experience within the UN system was a factor. Secondly, because I strongly wanted (and needed) to leave the country after just one year that I was back home. Thirdly, because since I was 17 I always participated, found and chaired non profit organizations dealing with or aimed to V4D.

Describe a day in your life as a UNV.

Wake up at 7am, do gym, iron the shirt-of-the-day, have a shower, have breakfast, choose suit and tie if any (only referred to the tie, of course), then grab documents spread all over the flat. I walk 25 minutes from home to the UN House trying not to close my day before time ending up into an open manhole, then I make myself and my colleague a tea or coffee while I wait for my pc to start up (from 5 to 10 minutes).

During working hours I deal both with OHCHR and UNV issues. At lunchtime I usually go to have something to eat either with my OHCHR colleagues or with other UNV Volunteers like Federica, UNV Intern in the RC Unit. Sometimes I stay in the office to continue working while quickly eating some samosa or salad.

Twice a week in the evening right after work I go with Federica to our Russian language classes with a private teacher who usually gives us from 40 up to 70 new words to learn by heart as homework from one day to the other. Many times, especially at the weekend, we hang out with our Kyrgyz/Spanish/French/Austrian/Swiss friends; some of them are here as UNV Volunteers and students. Usually in the evening when I’m at home I cook while studying Russian, downloading pictures from my camera or writing posts for my personal blog.

What is the best part of your UNV assignment?

I love working with Human Rights, having access to the newest analysis and information on all major HR topics and drafting projects to be submitted to my UNV and OHCHR supervisors. Finally, I love this post for it’s forcing me to learn Russian language.

What is the least favourite part of your UNV assignment?

Every time I realize that I don’t know Russian enough to be 100% accountable to deal with important tasks or with local population.

Has your UNV assignment reached/not reached your expectations?

It’s too early to answer to this question.

Would you recommend the UNV programme to other people and why?

I will tell you next February. Up to this moment it has been one of the most exciting experiences I have ever had in my life. Only the coming year will show if the experience is as new and exciting as now.

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One response »

  1. WILLAM MAKANGA says:

    I promise to work hard to serve the world with the gratest perssion of togethernes and diversfication,I speak French,English and swahili
    I will be so gratful if I am considered.

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